Plantings, The Journal of the World Sensorium Conservancy: Art, Science, Conservation
Plantings, The Journal of the World Sensorium Conservancy: Art, Science, Conservation

Issue 7: January 2022

Article

How urban agriculture can improve food security in US cities

By Miguel Altieri • January 1, 2022

Urban agriculture is imperative for more people to have access to fresh and healthful foods.

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Article

Fossils suggest an aquatic plant that bloomed underwater was among first flowering plants

By David Dilcher January 1, 2022

The Emeritus Professor of Geological Sciences and Paleobotany, Indiana University of the Montsechia, explores the fossil record of a plant which lived 130 million years ago.

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Article

An environmental sociologist explains how permaculture offers a path to climate justice

By Christina ErgasJanuary 1, 2022

The ethical philosophy and sustainable practices of permaculture take on a new urgency in a warming world.

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Interview

Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world

By David R. MontgomeryJanuary 1, 2022

The professor of earth and space sciences at the University of Washington, embarked on a 6-month trip studying the degradation of soil across farms.

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Poetry

Pétrichor

By Clara MullerJanuary 1, 2022

Poetry that amplifies our connection to the natural world and its range of emotions that defines the human experience.

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Interview

Scent and the Male Orchid Bee: A talk with Hsurae

By Gayil Nalls • January 1, 2022

Male orchid bees are perfume makers. They collect scents from floral and fetid objects to compose their perfume which they then store in special organs on the back of their hind legs. A practitioner of BioArt has preserved a form of this fragrance using the science of attraction. 

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Issue 6: December 2021

Article

The Amazing Growth of the Christmas Tree

By François Lévêque • December 1, 2021

Explore the past, present, and future of the Christmas tree.

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Article

Loved to death: Australian sandalwood is facing extinction in the wild

By Richard McLellan, David M Watson, and Kingsley DixonDecember 1, 2021

Part of rituals around the world since antiquity, Sandalwood is facing a crisis.

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Article

Your skin can ‘sniff’ certain aromas that help it heal faster

By Hanns HattDecember 1, 2021

The German scientist, who discovered olfactory receptors throughout the human body, tells us why traditions of aromatic plants use for ‘magical’ healing really work.

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Interview

Guided by Plant Voices

By Steve PaulsonDecember 1, 2021

An Interview with plant ecologist Monica Gagliano who knows plants are sensitive, feeling beings.

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Article

Inside my painter’s mind

By Catherine GropperDecember 1, 2021

The poet reminds us of our warming world and our shared humanity.

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Article

Aromatic Flora and Priority Conservation

By Gayil Nalls • December 1, 2021

Learn how conservationists prioritize endangered species, and why conservation must involve us all.

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Issue 5: November 2021

Interview

Pennsylvania’s Best Kept Secrets: An Interview with Rebecca Bowen

By Gail Nalls • November 1, 2021

We spoke with the conservationist, who is protecting rare wild plants for the state.

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Article

20 Beautiful New Biospheres

November 1, 2021

Take a look at 20 new biospheres that UNESCO has designated to help sustain life on our planet.

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Article

Listening to Nature: How Sound Can Help Us Understand Environmental Change

By Garth Paine • November 1, 2021

Learn how exposure to the sounds of nature is good for our health, well-being and happiness and can tell us about the health of the environment.

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Article

Learning to Speak Shrub

By Elizabeth Preston • November 1, 2021

An introduction to some thought-provoking ideas about how plants use molecular code to communicate and survive.

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Article

Human Tendencies

By Amos Zeeberg, Jonathon Keats & Brandon Keim • November 1, 2021

With good humor, the writers tell us about the traits we share with plants and animals.

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Article

Two Poems

By Judith McConnell Steele • November 1, 2021

A guide in poetry through the wilds of Idaho.

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Issue 4: October 2021

Article

How other primates self-medicate – and what they could teach us

By Sophia Daoudi • October 1, 2021

An animal behaviorist tells us about monkey species that eat plants, soils, and charcoal to both treat and prevent diseases.

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Article

A Fragrance Medicine Wheel Garden

By E. Barrie Kavasch • October 1, 2021

American Indian Medicine Wheel Gardens are an ancient and powerful way of creating a sacred planting space and working with natural energies for healing and renewal.

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Article

“Molecular Still Lives” Show the Science in Our Food in Us

By Heather Sparks • October 1, 2021

A journey into the painting subjects that depicts our modern food supply and how it impacts our bodies and lives.

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Article

Who Picks Whom?

By Jake Eshelman • October 1, 2021

Through photography and poetry, an artist and visual researcher explores the relationship between people, plants and magic, as told through the work and practice of aTexas-based witch, occult herbalist and microbiologist.

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Article

The Wisdom of Plants and the Future of Fashion

By Daria Dorosh • October 1, 2021

A pioneering advocate of sustainable fashion asks us to look to weeds for clothing inspiration.

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Article

Two of the Greatest ‘Healing Weeds’ in the World

By Nimal Chandrasena • October 1, 2021

An expert in the utilization of colonizing weed species profiles two highly significant medicinal plants from Eastern cultures.

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Issue 3: September 2021

Article

Rediscovering Bee battles: why our native pollinators are losing the war

By Kelsey K. Graham • September 1, 2021

As global commerce grows, the movement of goods is occurring at ever-faster rates. And with increased global trade comes the spread of non-native species. This includes invasive insects that are making life difficult for domestic bees.

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Article

15 Health and Well-being Benefits of Plants

By Charles Hall and Madeline W. Dickson • September 1, 2021

Why plants make us more resilient and help safeguard our future

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Article

Why Some Species Thrive after Catastrophe – Rules for Making the Most of an Apocalypse

By Nicholas R. Longrich • September 1, 2021

Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid struck the Earth. The world was plunged into darkness, killing the dinosaurs and over 90% of all species alive. Today, every living thing descends from the handful of surviving species. But not all survivors thrived.

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Article

Dumbarton Oaks Gardens; Celebrating Landscape and Legacy

By Liz Macklin • September 1, 2021

This year with a fanfare of blossoms and new energy in programs blending science and the arts, Dumbarton Oaks marks its one hundredth anniversary.

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Article

Life Always Wins. Follow Me.

By Richard Harkess • September 1, 2021

A botanist is introduced to escapees from the atomic bomb in Hiroshima.

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Article

Supporting Pollinators, Yourself, and Your Ecological Community with Anise Hyssop

By Gayil Nalls • September 1, 2021

With fragrance, food, and therapeutic properties, the giant anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) can be a big contributor to an eco-community.

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Issue 2: August 2021

Article

Rediscovering Dumbarton Oaks and one of America’s First Landscape Architects

By Liz Macklin • August 1, 2021

Liz Macklin explores the historic garden at Dumbarton Oaks with Director of Garden and Grounds, Jonathan Kavalier, and discuss the genius of Beatrix Farrand’s design and ways to meet challenges in today’s gardens.

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Article

We Crush, Poison, and Destroy Our Insects at Our Own Peril

By John Hainze • July 1, 2021

Insects are escape artists. Now they face a threat more pernicious than predation.

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Article

Stilled Chimeras

By Margaux Crump • August 1, 2021

Troubling the myth of individual identity.

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Article

Can Plants Think?

By Stuart Thompson • July 1, 2021

They could one day force us to change our definition of intelligence

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Article

Why Do Flowers Smell?

By Richard Harkess • July 1, 2021

Animal pollinators can carry pollen from one flower’s stigma to another flower’s ovule as they forage for food

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Article

The Plan of the Grounds

By Beatrix Farrand • July 1, 2021

Excepted from the Reef Point Gardens Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 3, September, 1948

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Issue 1: July 2021

Article

How to Plant the Forests of the Future

By Lauren Oakes • July 1, 2021

In the past, forest restoration could be informed by what once was. Now we have to make hard decisions about what we’re working toward.

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Article

Rising Levels of Carbon Dioxide: It’s personal

By Lewis Ziska • July 1, 2021

A large majority of people, even in the United States, recognize climate change as real, but the percent who are actively changing their lifestyle, aggressively fighting to prevent climate change is much smaller. Why?

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Article

How small family forests can help meet the climate challenge

By Gabriel Popkin • July 1, 2021

This 95-acre woods in south-central Pennsylvania’s ridge-and-valley country is a hunting and hiking refuge co-owned by eight families. As much as he loves it, Leiby knows it could be even better.

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Article

Mind the Gap Between Action and Impact

By Zachary Adams • July 1, 2021

Learning is rapid and reliable when rewards immediately follow the action and slow and even non-existent when rewards are substantially delayed in time.

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Interview

A Rare Plant Conservation Success Story from Gibraltar

By Gayil Nalls • July 1, 2021

Dr. Rhian Guillem of the Gibraltar Botanic Gardens discusses the Gibraltar Campion, Silene tomentosa.

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Article

One Thing We Could All Do To Make a Difference

By Gayil Nalls and the WS/C Advisory Board • July 1, 2021

I asked WSC’s knowledgeable Board of Advisors who have diverse expertise and perspectives to name one thing they think we all can do to make a difference. This is what they said. 

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